ECT Still in Use

Electroshock treatment—also known as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)—and psychosurgery “treatments” are reportedly trying to stage a comeback. Yet, since their inception, these procedures have been dogged by conflict between the ECT psychiatrists who swear by them, and the multitudes of victims and families of victims whose lives have been completely ruined by them.

So who is telling the truth? Anyone who has seen and been sickened by a recording of an actual ECT or psychosurgery procedure knows the answer too well. They have all the marks of physical torture methods that might instead belong in the armory of a KGB (secret police of the former Soviet Union) interrogator, rather than in the inventory of a “medical practitioner.” However, very few people have seen such recordings, including, it would seem, those who legislate their mandatory use—and fewer still have witnessed them firsthand.

Psychiatrists deceptively cloak these procedures with medical legitimacy: the hospital setting, white-coated assistants, anesthetics, muscle paralyzing drugs and sophisticated-looking equipment. The effects of shock treatment are horrific, but the full ramifications are not explained to the patients or families. Worse, when objections are raised, they are overruled.

That those procedures are extremely profitable to psychiatrists and hospitals, while resulting in continued long and expensive psychiatric “care” afterward, guaranteeing future business and income to the psychiatrist, is not mentioned in conversations to convince the unwilling or unsuspecting.Read More

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